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Swash Manor

Built in 1926

 

This area’s land was acquired from Dusenbury and Sarvis, Buck and Beaty (both turpentine dealers), and Gilbert and Potter (a New York factor). Much of this land was granted originally to members of the Withers family in the 1700s and extended from Withers Swash to Singleton Swash (the Dunes Club). It had passed through several owners, including Joshua John Ward.

The Withers family received a land grant from King George and their name has survived as Wither’s Swash, later known as Myrtle Swash or the Eight-Mile Swash. Mary Withers is buried in a colonial graveyard at Prince George Winyah Episcopal Church in Georgetown.

The Waccamaw tribe either inhabited or, more likely, visited the Long Bay area as summer tourists, where they scattered about some burial grounds and random shell mounds. Farming was not hugely rewarding in this sandy soil, so European settlers were reluctant to stay very long. One of several families to receive a land grant on this coast was the Withers, and that name has survived as Wither’s Swash, later known as Myrtle Swash or the Eight-Mile Swash. Mary Withers is buried in a colonial graveyard at Prince George Winyah Episcopal Church in Georgetown.

 

Bertha Collins was born on May 04, 1904 and died on January 12, 1992 at the age of 87 and the social security number (SSN): 249-07-6847. Bertha last resided in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina in Horry County.

 

 

 

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